PDE Geometric Analysis seminar

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The seminar will be held in room B115 of Van Vleck Hall on Mondays from 3:30pm - 4:30pm, unless indicated otherwise.

Previous PDE/GA seminars

Seminar Schedule Fall 2014

date speaker title host(s)
September 15 Greg Kuperberg (UC-Davis) Cartan-Hadamard and the Little Prince Viaclovsky
September 22 (joint with Analysis Seminar) Steve Hofmann (U. of Missouri) Quantitative Rectifiability and Elliptic Equations Seeger
Oct 6th, Xiangwen Zhang (Columbia University)
TBA
B.Wang
October 13 Xuwen Chen (Brown University)[1]
TBA
C.Kim
October 20 Kyudong Choi (UW-Madison)
Finite time blow up for 1D models for the 3D Axisymmetric Euler Equations the 2D Boussinesq system
C.Kim
October 27 Chanwoo Kim (UW-Madison)

BV-Regularity of the Boltzmann Equation in Non-Convex Domains

Local
November 10 Philip Isett (MIT) TBA C.Kim


Fall Abstracts

Greg Kuperberg

Cartan-Hadamard and the Little Prince.


Kyudong Choi

Finite time blow up for 1D models for the 3D Axisymmetric Euler Equations the 2D Boussinesq system

In connection with the recent proposal for possible singularity formation at the boundary for solutions of the 3d axi-symmetric incompressible Euler's equations / the 2D Boussinesq system (Luo and Hou, 2013), we study models for the dynamics at the boundary and show that they exhibit a finite-time blow-up from smooth data. This is joint work with T. Hou, A. Kiselev, G. Luo, V. Sverak, and Y. Yao.


Steve Hofmann

Quantitative Rectifiability and Elliptic Equations

A classical theorem of F. and M. Riesz states that for a simply connected domain in the complex plane with a rectifiable boundary, harmonic measure and arc length measure on the boundary are mutually absolutely continuous. On the other hand, an example of C. Bishop and P. Jones shows that the latter conclusion may fail, in the absence of some sort of connectivity hypothesis. In this talk, we discuss recent developments in an ongoing program to find scale-invariant, higher dimensional versions of the F. and M. Riesz Theorem, as well as converses. In particular, we discuss substitute results that continue to hold in the absence of any connectivity hypothesis.