Difference between revisions of "Using ssh"

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(Using ssh to Access Math Department Resources)
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The University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Mathematics maintains two login servers for ssh connections from outside the department.
 
The University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Mathematics maintains two login servers for ssh connections from outside the department.
  
# login0.math.wisc.edu: To connect to this server, you must have an IP address that corresponds to a wisc.edu host address. You can use the campus wireless[https://it.wisc.edu/services/wireless-uwnet/], Eduroam, or [https://it.wisc.edu/services/wiscvpn/]. Other names for this server are bing.math.wisc.edu and login.math.wisc.edu.
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# login0.math.wisc.edu: To connect to this server, you must have an IP address that corresponds to a wisc.edu host address. You can use the campus wireless[https://it.wisc.edu/services/wireless-uwnet/ | UWNet], [https://it.wisc.edu/services/wireless-eduroam/ | Eduroam], or [https://it.wisc.edu/services/wiscvpn/|WiscVPN]. Other names for this server are bing.math.wisc.edu and login.math.wisc.edu.
 
# login1.math.wisc.edu. To connect to this server, you must use an ssh key. For instructions on using an ssh key, see below. Another name for this server is abel.math.wisc.edu.
 
# login1.math.wisc.edu. To connect to this server, you must use an ssh key. For instructions on using an ssh key, see below. Another name for this server is abel.math.wisc.edu.
  
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To start your sage program, you might use an ssh client on your laptop to connect to login0.math.wisc.edu then run ssh again on login0 to connect to magma0. Please do not run research programs on login0 or login1. While these machines may have all the tools necessary to test programs, they are not powerful enough to handle more than the most trivial of tasks. If you run a program that uses a lot of resources on login0 or login1, you may prevent users (including yourself) from accessing these machines.
 
To start your sage program, you might use an ssh client on your laptop to connect to login0.math.wisc.edu then run ssh again on login0 to connect to magma0. Please do not run research programs on login0 or login1. While these machines may have all the tools necessary to test programs, they are not powerful enough to handle more than the most trivial of tasks. If you run a program that uses a lot of resources on login0 or login1, you may prevent users (including yourself) from accessing these machines.
 
A different set of instructions is also available here:  [https://docs.google.com/a/wisc.edu/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=d2lzYy5lZHV8bWF0aC1pbnRyYW5ldHxneDo1NDg5ZmE4MzZhMzVkNThk]
 

Revision as of 16:59, 15 November 2019

Using ssh to Access Math Department Resources

The University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Mathematics maintains two login servers for ssh connections from outside the department.

  1. login0.math.wisc.edu: To connect to this server, you must have an IP address that corresponds to a wisc.edu host address. You can use the campus wireless| UWNet, | Eduroam, or [1]. Other names for this server are bing.math.wisc.edu and login.math.wisc.edu.
  2. login1.math.wisc.edu. To connect to this server, you must use an ssh key. For instructions on using an ssh key, see below. Another name for this server is abel.math.wisc.edu.

To access Math Department resources via ssh, you must first use an ssh client to connect to either login0 or login1. You can then ssh to the system of your choice within the department.

For example, suppose you wished to run a sage program on one of the research servers. For simplicity sake, the research servers have aliases (nicknames) magma0, magma1, ..., magma19, with the more powerful machines having the lowest numbers.

To start your sage program, you might use an ssh client on your laptop to connect to login0.math.wisc.edu then run ssh again on login0 to connect to magma0. Please do not run research programs on login0 or login1. While these machines may have all the tools necessary to test programs, they are not powerful enough to handle more than the most trivial of tasks. If you run a program that uses a lot of resources on login0 or login1, you may prevent users (including yourself) from accessing these machines.