Jordan S. Ellenberg

Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of Mathematics

325 Van Vleck Hall
Department of Mathematics
University of Wisconsin
480 Lincoln Drive
Madison, WI 53706

e-mail:  ellenber@math.wisc.edu

(photo: Emmanuel Kowalski)

I've been at Wisconsin since the fall of 2005. My field is arithmetic algebraic geometry: my specific interests include rational points on varieties, enumeration of number fields and other arithmetic objects, Galois representations attached to varieties and their fundamental groups, representation stability and FI-modules, the geometry of large data sets, non-abelian Iwasawa theory, pro-p group theory, automorphic forms, stable cohomology of moduli spaces, the complex of curves, Hilbert-Blumenthal abelian varieties, Q-curves, Serre's conjecture, the ABC conjecture, and Diophantine problems related to all of the above. My research here is partially supported by an NSF grant and a Romnes Faculty Fellowship. I am a co-organizer of the Wisconsin number theory seminar. the organizer of the interdisciplinary "Math And..." seminar, and PI on the NSF-RTG "Algebraic Geometry and Number Theory at the University of Wisconsin" grant. I am also a Discovery Fellow at the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery.


NEW NEWS:

My book How Not To Be Wrong is out now from Penguin Press. See my author page for excerpts, reviews, and event dates.

I will be giving an AMS-MAA Invited Address at the 2015 Joint Meetings in San Antonio, topic TBD.

OLD NEWS:

I was one of the speakers at the 2014 Arizona Winter School on arithmetic statistics in March 2014: the topic of my lectures was "Geometric Analytic Number Theory."

I was an organizer of the long program at IPAM on Algebraic Techniques for Combinatorial and Computational Geometry, to be held March-June 2014.

Alina Bucur, Chantal David, organized a workshop at AIM on Arithmetic Statistics over Finite Fields and Function Fields in January 2014. Nigel Boston and I organized a one-day miniconference here at UW-Madison: Group Theory, Number Theory, and Topology Day, on January 24, 2013. Nathan Dunfield, Alan Reid, and Tamar Ziegler spoke on topics at the interface of the three subjects.

Akshay Venkatesh and I organized a special session with the incredibly specific title of "Geometry and Number Theory" at the 2013 Joint Meetings in San Diego.

In February 2012, I was an organizer of an MSRI Hot Topics workshop on Thin Groups and Super-strong approximation. (Streaming video of talks available behind the link.)

The most recent Midwest Number Theory Conference for Graduate Students was held in Madison on November 19-20, 2011. Both this conference and the graduate student algebraic geometry conference were supported by the NSF-RTG grant held by UW-Madison.

The Midwest Algebraic Geometry Conference for Graduate Students was held in Madison on October 23-24, 2010.

On April 24-25, 2010, Jean-Luc Thiffeault and I organized a weekend workshop on pseudo-Anosovs with small dilatation, a subject that occupies a very interesting interface between topology, dynamics, and arithmetic.

We hosted Midwest Number Theory Day on November 6, 2009, featuring talks by Joe Rabinoff, Sug-Woo Shin, Kirsten Wickelgren, and Mike Zieve. The following weekend, November 7-8, we hosted the Sixth Midwest Number Theory Conference for Graduate Students.


I wrote a novel called The Grasshopper King, which came out in 2003 from Coffee House Press. I also write the "Do The Math" column in Slate, and have written articles on mathematical topics for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, Wired, and The Believer. My latest book in the general vein of "mathematical ideas that are useful to people who don't do math for a living," is called How Not To Be Wrong, which was recently published by Penguin Press.

I used to live in Princeton, NJ; a popular feature of my old web page was How to Eat Dinner in Princeton. Warning: this page is accurate only up to August 2005.

My current graduate students: Vlad Matei, Lalit Jain, Silas Johnson, Evan Dummit, Daniel Ross, and Rohit Nagpal. If you are considering joining this learned crew, you should read this page.

My former graduate students:

Papers and Preprints

Curriculum Vitae

Personal Page

Teaching

Barry Mazur's Mathematical Genealogy (no longer updated in light of the Mathematics Genealogy Project)

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Jordan Ellenberg * ellenber@math.wisc.edu * revised 7 Mar 2013