Department of Mathematics

Van Vleck Hall, 480 Lincoln Drive, Madison, WI

Summer Term

All Summer 2021 math courses will be taught in a remote format.

All courses, times, and modalities are listed in the Course Search & Enroll app.

Technology Requirements

Please see the linked PDF message from the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning, and the Vice Provost for Information Technology, regarding UW-Madison Student Technology Needs.

Although already mentioned in the previous document, the Math Department would like for students to have working webcams for remote courses, in the case that instructors would like to use the cameras to proctor exams. If you have any questions about the webcam and exams, please contact the course instructor.

Things to Consider

Please also keep in mind that summer math courses cover the same content as regular 16-week courses in the fall and spring, albeit in a more condensed, 8-week format. Since summer courses are relatively fast-paced, and since all math courses are being taught through synchronous instruction, consider your summer credit and course loads (i.e., the number of credits and courses you’re planning to take), course rigor, and other summer commitments when thinking about your summer courses. In particular, if you are taking more than one course, please remember to keep the workload expectations of the courses in mind (though it is good to keep in mind for any course load). You will need to exercise good time management skills in order to take summer courses, and to take math courses in particular.

The UW-Madison Summer Term website has a page on prepping for summer success in online courses: https://summer.wisc.edu/online-courses/.

UW-Madison Department of Mathematics
Van Vleck Hall
480 Lincoln Drive
Madison, WI  53706

(608) 263-3054

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