Difference between revisions of "AMS Student Chapter Seminar"

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(October 16, Jiaxin Jin)
 
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The AMS Student Chapter Seminar is an informal, graduate student-run seminar on a wide range of mathematical topics. Pastries (usually donuts) will be provided.
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The AMS Student Chapter Seminar is an informal, graduate student seminar on a wide range of mathematical topics. Pastries (usually donuts) will be provided.
  
 
* '''When:''' Wednesdays, 3:20 PM – 3:50 PM
 
* '''When:''' Wednesdays, 3:20 PM – 3:50 PM
 
* '''Where:''' Van Vleck, 9th floor lounge (unless otherwise announced)
 
* '''Where:''' Van Vleck, 9th floor lounge (unless otherwise announced)
* '''Organizers:''' [https://www.math.wisc.edu/~malexis/ Michel Alexis], [https://www.math.wisc.edu/~drwagner/ David Wagner], [http://www.math.wisc.edu/~nicodemus/ Patrick Nicodemus], [http://www.math.wisc.edu/~thaison/ Son Tu]
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* '''Organizers:''' [https://www.math.wisc.edu/~malexis/ Michel Alexis], [https://www.math.wisc.edu/~drwagner/ David Wagner], [http://www.math.wisc.edu/~nicodemus/ Patrick Nicodemus], [http://www.math.wisc.edu/~thaison/ Son Tu], Carrie Chen
  
 
Everyone is welcome to give a talk. To sign up, please contact one of the organizers with a title and abstract. Talks are 30 minutes long and should avoid assuming significant mathematical background beyond first-year graduate courses.
 
Everyone is welcome to give a talk. To sign up, please contact one of the organizers with a title and abstract. Talks are 30 minutes long and should avoid assuming significant mathematical background beyond first-year graduate courses.
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The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found [[AMS Student Chapter Seminar, previous semesters|here]].
 
The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found [[AMS Student Chapter Seminar, previous semesters|here]].
  
== Fall 2018 ==
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== Fall 2019 ==
  
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=== October 9, Brandon Boggess===
  
=== September 26, Vladimir Sotirov ===
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Title: An Application of Elliptic Curves to the Theory of Internet Memes
  
Title: Geometric Algebra
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Abstract: Solve polynomial equations with this one weird trick! Math teachers hate him!!!
  
Abstract: Geometric algebra, developed at the end of the 19th century by Grassman, Clifford, and Lipschitz, is the forgotten progenitor of the linear algebra we use to this day developed by Gibbs and Heaviside.
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[[File:Thumbnail fruit meme.png]]
In this short introduction, I will use geometric algebra to do two things. First, I will construct the field of complex numbers and the division algebra of the quaternions in a coordinate-free way. Second, I will derive the geometric interpretation of complex numbers and quaternions as representations of rotations in 2- and 3-dimensional space.  
 
  
=== October 3, Juliette Bruce ===
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=== October 16, Jiaxin Jin===
  
Title: Kissing Conics
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Title: Persistence and global stability for biochemical reaction-diffusion systems
  
Abstract: Have you every wondered how you can easily tell when two plane conics kiss (i.e. are tangent to each other at a point)? If so this talk is for you, well there will be donuts.
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Abstract: The investigation of the dynamics of solutions of nonlinear reaction-diffusion PDE systems generated by biochemical networks is a great challenge; in general, even the existence of classical solutions is difficult to establish. On the other hand, these kinds of problems appear very often in biological applications, e.g., when trying to understand the role of spatial inhomogeneities in living cells. We discuss the persistence and global stability properties of special classes of such systems, under additional assumptions such as: low number of species, complex balance or weak reversibility.
  
=== October 10, Kurt Ehlert ===
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=== October 23, Erika Pirnes===
  
Title: How to bet when gambling
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(special edition: carrot seminar)
  
Abstract: When gambling, typically casinos have the edge. But sometimes we can gain an edge by counting cards or other means. And sometimes we have an edge in the biggest casino of all: the financial markets. When we do have an advantage, then we still need to decide how much to bet. Bet too little, and we leave money on the table. Bet too much, and we risk financial ruin. We will discuss the "Kelly criterion", which is a betting strategy that is optimal in many senses.
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Title: Why do ice hockey players fall in love with mathematicians? (Behavior of certain number string sequences)
  
=== October 17, Bryan Oakley ===
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Abstract: Starting with some string of digits 0-9, add the adjacent numbers pairwise to obtain a new string. Whenever the sum is 10 or greater, separate its digits. For example, 26621 would become 81283 and then 931011. Repeating this process with different inputs gives varying behavior. In some cases the process terminates (becomes a single digit), or ends up in a loop, like 999, 1818, 999... The length of the strings can also start growing very fast. I'll discuss some data and conjectures about classifying the behavior.
  
Title: Mixing rates
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=== October 30, Yunbai Cao===
 
 
Abstract: Mixing is a necessary step in many areas from biology and atmospheric sciences to smoothies. Because we are impatient, the goal is usually to improve the rate at which a substance homogenizes. In this talk we define and quantify mixing and rates of mixing. We present some history of the field as well as current research and open questions.
 
 
 
=== October 24, TBD ===
 
 
 
Title: TBD
 
 
 
Abstract: TBD
 
 
 
=== October 31, TBD ===
 
 
 
Title: TBD
 
 
 
Abstract: TBD
 
 
 
=== November 7, TBD ===
 
  
 
Title: TBD
 
Title: TBD
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Abstract: TBD
 
Abstract: TBD
  
=== November 14, Soumya Sankar ===
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=== November 6, Tung Nguyen===
  
 
Title: TBD
 
Title: TBD
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Abstract: TBD
 
Abstract: TBD
  
=== November 21, Cancelled due to Thanksgiving===
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=== November 13, Stephen Davis===
  
 
Title: TBD
 
Title: TBD
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Abstract: TBD
 
Abstract: TBD
  
=== November 28, Niudun Wang ===
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=== November 20, Colin Crowley===
  
 
Title: TBD
 
Title: TBD
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Abstract: TBD
 
Abstract: TBD
  
=== December 5, TBD ===
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=== December 4, Xiaocheng Li===
  
 
Title: TBD
 
Title: TBD
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Abstract: TBD
 
Abstract: TBD
  
=== December 12, TBD ===
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=== December 11, Chaojie Yuan===
  
 
Title: TBD
 
Title: TBD
  
 
Abstract: TBD
 
Abstract: TBD

Latest revision as of 13:43, 14 October 2019

The AMS Student Chapter Seminar is an informal, graduate student seminar on a wide range of mathematical topics. Pastries (usually donuts) will be provided.

Everyone is welcome to give a talk. To sign up, please contact one of the organizers with a title and abstract. Talks are 30 minutes long and should avoid assuming significant mathematical background beyond first-year graduate courses.

The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found here.

Fall 2019

October 9, Brandon Boggess

Title: An Application of Elliptic Curves to the Theory of Internet Memes

Abstract: Solve polynomial equations with this one weird trick! Math teachers hate him!!!

Thumbnail fruit meme.png

October 16, Jiaxin Jin

Title: Persistence and global stability for biochemical reaction-diffusion systems

Abstract: The investigation of the dynamics of solutions of nonlinear reaction-diffusion PDE systems generated by biochemical networks is a great challenge; in general, even the existence of classical solutions is difficult to establish. On the other hand, these kinds of problems appear very often in biological applications, e.g., when trying to understand the role of spatial inhomogeneities in living cells. We discuss the persistence and global stability properties of special classes of such systems, under additional assumptions such as: low number of species, complex balance or weak reversibility.

October 23, Erika Pirnes

(special edition: carrot seminar)

Title: Why do ice hockey players fall in love with mathematicians? (Behavior of certain number string sequences)

Abstract: Starting with some string of digits 0-9, add the adjacent numbers pairwise to obtain a new string. Whenever the sum is 10 or greater, separate its digits. For example, 26621 would become 81283 and then 931011. Repeating this process with different inputs gives varying behavior. In some cases the process terminates (becomes a single digit), or ends up in a loop, like 999, 1818, 999... The length of the strings can also start growing very fast. I'll discuss some data and conjectures about classifying the behavior.

October 30, Yunbai Cao

Title: TBD

Abstract: TBD

November 6, Tung Nguyen

Title: TBD

Abstract: TBD

November 13, Stephen Davis

Title: TBD

Abstract: TBD

November 20, Colin Crowley

Title: TBD

Abstract: TBD

December 4, Xiaocheng Li

Title: TBD

Abstract: TBD

December 11, Chaojie Yuan

Title: TBD

Abstract: TBD