Difference between revisions of "AMS Student Chapter Seminar"

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The AMS Student Chapter Seminar is an informal, graduate student-run seminar on a wide range of mathematical topics. Pastries (usually donuts) will be provided.
 
The AMS Student Chapter Seminar is an informal, graduate student-run seminar on a wide range of mathematical topics. Pastries (usually donuts) will be provided.
  
* '''When:''' Wednesdays, 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM
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* '''When:''' Wednesdays, 3:20 PM – 3:50 PM
 
* '''Where:''' Van Vleck, 9th floor lounge (unless otherwise announced)
 
* '''Where:''' Van Vleck, 9th floor lounge (unless otherwise announced)
* '''Organizers:''' [https://www.math.wisc.edu/~hast/ Daniel Hast], [https://www.math.wisc.edu/~mrjulian/ Ryan Julian], Cullen McDonald, [https://www.math.wisc.edu/~zcharles/ Zachary Charles]
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* '''Organizers:''' [https://www.math.wisc.edu/~malexis/ Michel Alexis], [https://www.math.wisc.edu/~drwagner/ David Wagner], [http://www.math.wisc.edu/~nicodemus/ Patrick Nicodemus], [http://www.math.wisc.edu/~thaison/ Son Tu]
  
 
Everyone is welcome to give a talk. To sign up, please contact one of the organizers with a title and abstract. Talks are 30 minutes long and should avoid assuming significant mathematical background beyond first-year graduate courses.
 
Everyone is welcome to give a talk. To sign up, please contact one of the organizers with a title and abstract. Talks are 30 minutes long and should avoid assuming significant mathematical background beyond first-year graduate courses.
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The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found [[AMS Student Chapter Seminar, previous semesters|here]].
 
The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found [[AMS Student Chapter Seminar, previous semesters|here]].
  
== Spring 2017 ==
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== Fall 2018 ==
  
=== January 25, Brandon Alberts ===
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=== September 19, TBD ===
  
Title: Ultraproducts - they aren't just for logicians
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Title: TBD
  
Abstract: If any of you have attended a logic talk (or one of Ivan's donut seminar talks) you may have learned about ultraproducts as a weird way to mash sets together to get bigger sets in a nice way. Something particularly useful to set theorists, but maybe not so obviously useful to the rest of us. I will give an accessible introduction to ultraproducts and motivate their use in other areas of mathematics.
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Abstract: TBD
  
=== February 1, Megan Maguire ===
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=== September 26, TBD ===
  
Title: Hyperbolic crochet workshop
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Title: TBD
  
Abstract: TBA
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Abstract: TBD
 
 
=== February 8, Cullen McDonald ===
 
 
 
=== February 15, Paul Tveite ===
 
 
 
Title: Fun with Hamel Bases!
 
 
 
Abstract: If we view the real numbers as a vector field over the rationals, then of course they have a basis (assuming the AOC). This is called a Hamel basis and allows us to do some cool things. Among other things, we will define two periodic functions that sum to the identity function.
 
 
 
=== February 22, Wil Cocke ===
 
 
 
Title: Practical Graph Isomorphism
 
 
 
Abstract: Some graphs are different and some graphs are the same. Sometimes graphs differ only in name. When you give me a graph, you've picked an order. But, is it the same graph across every border?
 
 
 
=== March 1, Megan Maguire ===
 
 
 
Title: I stole this talk from Jordan.
 
 
 
Abstract: Stability is cool! And sometimes things we think don't have stability secretly do. This is an abridged version of a very cool talk I've seen Jordan give a couple times. All credit goes to him. Man, I should have stolen his abstract too.
 
 
 
=== March 7, Liban Mohamed ===
 
 
 
Title: Strichartz Estimates from Qualitative to Quantitative
 
 
 
Abstract: Strichartz estimates are inequalities that give one way understand the decay of solutions to dispersive PDEs. This talk is an attempt to reconcile the formal statements with physical intuition.
 
 
 
=== March 15, Zachary Charles ===
 
 
 
Title: Netflix Problem and Chill
 
 
 
Abstract: How are machine learning, matrix analysis, and Napoleon Dynamite related? Come find out!
 
 
 
=== April 5, Vlad Matei ===
 
 
 
=== April 12, Micky Steinberg ===
 
 
 
Title: Groups as metric spaces
 
 
 
Abstract: Given a group as a set of generators and relations, we can define the “word metric” on the group as the length of the shortest word “between” two elements. This isn’t well-defined, since different generating sets give different metrics, but it is well-defined up to “quasi-isometry”.  Come find out what we can do with this! There will lots of pictures and hand-waving!
 
 
 
=== April 19, Solly Parenti ===
 
 
 
Title: Elementary Integration
 
 
 
Abstract: Are you like me? Have you also told your calculus students that finding the antiderivative of e^(-x^2) is impossible? Do you also only have a slight idea about how to prove it? Come find out more about the proof and free yourself of that guilt.
 
 
 
=== April 26, Ben Bruce ===
 
 
 
Title: Permutation models
 
 
 
Abstract: Permutation models belong to a version of axiomatic set theory known as "set theory with atoms." I will give some examples of permutation models and highlight their connection to the axiom of choice and notions of infinity. There will be concrete examples, and no prior knowledge of set theory is required.
 
 
 
=== May 3, Iván Ongay-Valverde ===
 
 
 
Title: Living with countably many reals?
 
 
 
Abstract: Can I make you believe that a countable set of reals are all the reals? If we just have countably many reals, what happens with the others? Do they have any special properties? Let's play a little with our notion of 'reality' and allow to ourselves to find crazy reals doing weird things. Hopefully, no-one's headache will last forever.
 

Revision as of 14:31, 5 September 2018

This page has not been updated in more than 1 year.


The AMS Student Chapter Seminar is an informal, graduate student-run seminar on a wide range of mathematical topics. Pastries (usually donuts) will be provided.

Everyone is welcome to give a talk. To sign up, please contact one of the organizers with a title and abstract. Talks are 30 minutes long and should avoid assuming significant mathematical background beyond first-year graduate courses.

The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found here.

Fall 2018

September 19, TBD

Title: TBD

Abstract: TBD

September 26, TBD

Title: TBD

Abstract: TBD