Difference between revisions of "Applied/ACMS/absF17"

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(Created page with "= ACMS Abstracts: Fall 2017 = === Jinzi Mac Huang (Courant) === ''Non-hydrostatic extension of classical shallow-water models'' In geology, dissolution in fluids leads to n...")
 
(Jinzi Mac Huang (Courant))
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=== Jinzi Mac Huang (Courant) ===
 
=== Jinzi Mac Huang (Courant) ===
  
''Non-hydrostatic extension of classical shallow-water models''
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''Sculpting of a dissolving body''
  
 
In geology, dissolution in fluids leads to natural pattern formations. For example the Karst topography occurs when water dissolves limestone, and travertine terraces form as a balance of dissolution and precipitation. In this talk, we consider the shape dynamics of a soluble object immersed in water, with either external flow imposed or convective flow under gravity. We find that different flow configurations lead to different shape dynamics, for example a terminal self-similar shape emerges from dissolving in external flow, while fine scale patterns form when no external flow is imposed. We also find that under gravity, a dissolving body with initially smooth surface evolves into an increasingly sharp needle shape. A mathematical model predicts that a geometric shock forms at the tip of dissolved body, with the tip curvature becoming infinite in finite time.
 
In geology, dissolution in fluids leads to natural pattern formations. For example the Karst topography occurs when water dissolves limestone, and travertine terraces form as a balance of dissolution and precipitation. In this talk, we consider the shape dynamics of a soluble object immersed in water, with either external flow imposed or convective flow under gravity. We find that different flow configurations lead to different shape dynamics, for example a terminal self-similar shape emerges from dissolving in external flow, while fine scale patterns form when no external flow is imposed. We also find that under gravity, a dissolving body with initially smooth surface evolves into an increasingly sharp needle shape. A mathematical model predicts that a geometric shock forms at the tip of dissolved body, with the tip curvature becoming infinite in finite time.

Revision as of 13:35, 1 September 2017

ACMS Abstracts: Fall 2017

Jinzi Mac Huang (Courant)

Sculpting of a dissolving body

In geology, dissolution in fluids leads to natural pattern formations. For example the Karst topography occurs when water dissolves limestone, and travertine terraces form as a balance of dissolution and precipitation. In this talk, we consider the shape dynamics of a soluble object immersed in water, with either external flow imposed or convective flow under gravity. We find that different flow configurations lead to different shape dynamics, for example a terminal self-similar shape emerges from dissolving in external flow, while fine scale patterns form when no external flow is imposed. We also find that under gravity, a dissolving body with initially smooth surface evolves into an increasingly sharp needle shape. A mathematical model predicts that a geometric shock forms at the tip of dissolved body, with the tip curvature becoming infinite in finite time.