Difference between revisions of "Graduate Logic Seminar"

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The Graduate Logic Seminar is an informal space where graduate student and professors present topics related to logic which are not necessarly original or completed work. This is an space focus principally in  practicing presentation skills or learning materials that are not usually presented on a class.
+
The Graduate Logic Seminar is an informal space where graduate students and professors present topics related to logic which are not necessarily original or completed work. This is a space focused principally on practicing presentation skills or learning materials that are not usually presented in a class.
  
* '''When:''' Mondays, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (unless otherwise announced).
+
* '''When:''' Mondays 4p-5p (unless stated otherwise)
* '''Where:''' Van Vleck B235 (unless otherwise announced).
+
* '''Where:''' on line (ask for code).
* '''Organizers:''' [https://www.math.wisc.edu/~msoskova/ Mariya Soskava]
+
* '''Organizers:''' [https://www.math.wisc.edu/~jgoh/ Jun Le Goh]
  
Talks schedule are arrange and decide at the beginning of each semester. If you would like to participate, please contact one of the organizers.
+
The talk schedule is arranged at the beginning of each semester. If you would like to participate, please contact one of the organizers.
  
== Spring 2018 ==
+
Sign up for the graduate logic seminar mailing list:  join-grad-logic-sem@lists.wisc.edu
  
=== January 29, Organizational meeting ===
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== Fall 2020 - Tentative schedule ==
  
This day we decided the schedule for the semester.
+
=== September 14 - Josiah Jacobsen-Grocott ===
  
=== February 5, Uri Andrews ===
+
Title: Degrees of points in topological spaces
  
Title: Building Models of Strongly Minimal Theories - Part 1
+
Abstract: An overview of some results from Takayuki Kihara, Keng Meng Ng, and Arno Pauly in their paper Enumeration Degrees and Non-Metrizable Topology. We will look at a range of topological spaces and the corresponding classes in the enumeration degrees as well as ways in which we can distinguish the type of classes using the separation axioms.
  
Abstract: Since I'm talking in the Tuesday seminar as well, I'll use
+
=== September 28 - James Hanson ===
the Monday seminar talk to do some background on the topic and some
 
lemmas that will go into the proofs in Tuesday's talk. There will be
 
(I hope) some theorems of interest to see on both days, and both on
 
the general topic of answering the following question: What do you
 
need to know about a strongly minimal theory in order to compute
 
copies of all of its countable models. I'll start with a definition
 
for strongly minimal theories and build up from there.
 
  
=== February 12, James Hanson ===
+
Title: The Semilattice of Definable Sets in Continuous Logic
  
Title: Finding Definable Sets in Continuous Logic
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Abstract: After an analysis-free exposition of definable sets in continuous logic, we will present a fun, illustrated proof that any finite bounded lattice can be the poset of definable subsets of $S_1(T)$ for a continuous theory $T$.
  
Abstract: In order to be useful the notion of a 'definable set' in
+
=== October 5 - Tejas Bhojraj from 3:30PM-4:00PM ===
continuous logic is stricter than a naive comparison to discrete logic
 
would suggest. As a consequence, even in relatively tame theories
 
there can be very few definable sets. For example, there is a
 
superstable theory with no non-trivial definable sets. As we'll see,
 
however, there are many definable sets in omega-stable,
 
omega-categorical, and other small theories.
 
  
=== February 19, Noah Schweber ===
+
Title: A Levin-Schnorr type result for Weak Solovay random states.
  
Title: Proper forcing
+
Abstract: We look at the initial-segment complexity of Weak Solovay quantum random states using MK, a prefix-free version of quantum Kolmogorov complexity. The statement of our result is similar to the Levin-Schnorr theorem in classical algorithmic randomness.
  
Abstract: Although a given forcing notion may have nice properties on
+
=== November 9 - Karthik Ravishankar ===
its own, those properties might vanish when we apply it repeatedly.
 
Early preservation results (that is, theorems saying that the
 
iteration of forcings with a nice property retains that nice property)
 
were fairly limited, and things really got off the ground with
 
Shelah's invention of "proper forcing." Roughly speaking, a forcing is
 
proper if it can be approximated by elementary submodels of the
 
universe in a particularly nice way. I'll define proper forcing and
 
sketch some applications.
 
  
=== February 26, Patrick Nicodemus ===
+
Title: Elementary submodels in infinite combinatorics
  
Title: A survey of computable and constructive mathematics in economic history
+
Abstract: The usage of elementary submodels is a simple but powerful method to prove theorems, or to simplify proofs in infinite combinatorics. In the first part of the talk, we quickly cover the basic concepts involved for proving results using elementary submodels, and move on to provide two examples of application of the technique to prove two popular results from set theory: The Delta System lemma and the Fodors Pressing down lemma . We provide both the classical proof as well as a proof using elementary submodels to contrast the two approaches.
  
=== March 5, Tamvana Makulumi ===
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=== November 16 - Karthik Ravishankar ===
  
Title: Convexly Orderable Groups
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Title: Elementary submodels in infinite combinatorics, part II
  
=== March 12, Dan Turetsky (University of Notre Dame) ===
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Abstract: In the second part of the talk, we give a proof Fodors Pressing down lemma, along with an overview of the slightly larger proof of the Nash Williams theorem which states that a graph is decomposable as a disjoint union of cycles if and only if it has no odd cut.
  
Title: Structural Jump
+
=== Tuesday, November 24 - Tonicha Crook (Swansea University) from 9:00AM-10:00AM ===
  
=== March 19, Ethan McCarthy ===
+
Title: The Weihrauch Degree of Finding Nash Equilibria in Multiplayer Games
  
Title: Networks and degrees of points in non-second countable spaces
+
Abstract: Is there an algorithm that takes a game in normal form as input, and outputs a Nash equilibrium? If the payoffs are integers, the answer is yes, and a lot of work has been done in its computational complexity. If the payoffs are permitted to be real numbers, the answer is no, for continuity reasons. It is worthwhile to investigate the precise degree of non-computability (the Weihrauch degree), since knowing the degree entails what other approaches are available (eg, is there a randomized algorithm with positive success change?). The two player case has already been fully classified, but the multiplayer case remains open and is addressed here. As well as some insight into finding the roots of polynomials, which is essential in our research. An in-depth introduction to Weihrauch Reducibility will be included in the presentation, along with a small introduction to Game Theory.
  
=== April 2, Wil Cocke ===
+
=== November 30 - Yvette Ren ===
  
Title: Characterizing Finite Nilpotent Groups via Word Maps
+
Title, abstract TBA
 
 
Abstract: In this talk, we will examine a novel characterization of finite
 
nilpotent groups using the probability distributions induced by word
 
maps. In particular we show that a finite group is nilpotent if and
 
only if every surjective word map has fibers of uniform size.
 
 
 
=== April 9, Tejas Bhojraj ===
 
 
 
Title: Quantum Randomness
 
 
 
Abstract: I will read the paper by Nies and Scholz where they define a notion of
 
algorithmic randomness for infinite sequences of quantum bits
 
(qubits). This talk will cover the basic notions of quantum randomness
 
on which my talk on Tuesday will be based.
 
 
 
=== April 16, [http://www.math.wisc.edu/~ongay/ Iván Ongay-Valverde] ===
 
 
 
Title: What can we say about sets made by the union of Turing equivalence classes?
 
 
 
Abstract: It is well known that given a real number x (in the real line) the set of all reals that have the same Turing degree (we will call this a Turing equivalence class) have order type 'the rationals' and that, unless x is computable, the set is not a subfield of the reals. Nevertheless, what can we say about the order type or the algebraic structure of a set made by the uncountable union of Turing equivalence classes?
 
 
 
This topic hasn't been deeply studied. In this talk I will focus principally on famous order types and answer whether they can be achieved or not. Furthermore, I will explain some possible connections with the automorphism problem of the Turing degrees.
 
 
 
This is a work in progress, so this talk will have multiple open questions and opportunities for feedback and public participation (hopefully).
 
 
 
=== April 23, [http://www.math.wisc.edu/~mccarthy/ Ethan McCarthy] (Thesis Defense) ===
 
 
 
Title: TBA
 
 
 
Abstract: TBA
 
 
 
=== April 30, [http://www.math.uconn.edu/~westrick/ Linda Brown Westrick] (from University Of Connecticut) ===
 
 
 
Title: TBA
 
 
 
Abstract: TBA
 
 
 
=== May 7, TBA ===
 
 
 
Title: TBA
 
 
 
Abstract: TBA
 
 
 
== Fall 2017 ==
 
 
 
=== September 11, Organizational meeting ===
 
 
 
This day we decided the schedule for the semester.
 
 
 
=== September 18, (person) ===
 
 
 
Title:
 
 
 
Abstract:
 
 
 
=== September 25, (Person) ===
 
 
 
Title:
 
 
 
Abstract:
 
 
 
=== October 2, (Person) ===
 
 
 
Title:
 
 
 
Abstract:
 
 
 
=== October 9, (Person) ===
 
 
 
Title:
 
 
 
Abstract:
 
 
 
=== October 16, (Person) ===
 
 
 
Title:
 
 
 
Abstract:
 
 
 
=== October 23, (Person) ===
 
 
 
Title:
 
 
 
Abstract:
 
 
 
=== October 30, Iván Ongay-Valverde ===
 
 
 
Title:
 
 
 
Abstract:
 
 
 
=== November 6, (Person) ===
 
 
 
Title:
 
 
 
Abstract:
 
 
 
=== November 13, (Person) ===
 
 
 
Title:
 
 
 
Abstract:
 
 
 
=== November 20, (Person) ===
 
 
 
Title:
 
 
 
Abstract:
 
 
 
=== November 27, (Person) ===
 
 
 
Title: TBA
 
 
 
Abstract: TBA
 
 
 
=== December 4, (Person) ===
 
 
 
Title: TBA
 
 
 
Abstract: TBA
 
 
 
=== December 11, (Person) ===
 
 
 
Title: TBA
 
 
 
Abstract: TBA
 
  
 
==Previous Years==
 
==Previous Years==
  
The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found [[Logic Graduate Seminar, previous semesters|here]].
+
The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found [[Graduate Logic Seminar, previous semesters|here]].

Revision as of 10:45, 18 November 2020

The Graduate Logic Seminar is an informal space where graduate students and professors present topics related to logic which are not necessarily original or completed work. This is a space focused principally on practicing presentation skills or learning materials that are not usually presented in a class.

  • When: Mondays 4p-5p (unless stated otherwise)
  • Where: on line (ask for code).
  • Organizers: Jun Le Goh

The talk schedule is arranged at the beginning of each semester. If you would like to participate, please contact one of the organizers.

Sign up for the graduate logic seminar mailing list: join-grad-logic-sem@lists.wisc.edu

Fall 2020 - Tentative schedule

September 14 - Josiah Jacobsen-Grocott

Title: Degrees of points in topological spaces

Abstract: An overview of some results from Takayuki Kihara, Keng Meng Ng, and Arno Pauly in their paper Enumeration Degrees and Non-Metrizable Topology. We will look at a range of topological spaces and the corresponding classes in the enumeration degrees as well as ways in which we can distinguish the type of classes using the separation axioms.

September 28 - James Hanson

Title: The Semilattice of Definable Sets in Continuous Logic

Abstract: After an analysis-free exposition of definable sets in continuous logic, we will present a fun, illustrated proof that any finite bounded lattice can be the poset of definable subsets of $S_1(T)$ for a continuous theory $T$.

October 5 - Tejas Bhojraj from 3:30PM-4:00PM

Title: A Levin-Schnorr type result for Weak Solovay random states.

Abstract: We look at the initial-segment complexity of Weak Solovay quantum random states using MK, a prefix-free version of quantum Kolmogorov complexity. The statement of our result is similar to the Levin-Schnorr theorem in classical algorithmic randomness.

November 9 - Karthik Ravishankar

Title: Elementary submodels in infinite combinatorics

Abstract: The usage of elementary submodels is a simple but powerful method to prove theorems, or to simplify proofs in infinite combinatorics. In the first part of the talk, we quickly cover the basic concepts involved for proving results using elementary submodels, and move on to provide two examples of application of the technique to prove two popular results from set theory: The Delta System lemma and the Fodors Pressing down lemma . We provide both the classical proof as well as a proof using elementary submodels to contrast the two approaches.

November 16 - Karthik Ravishankar

Title: Elementary submodels in infinite combinatorics, part II

Abstract: In the second part of the talk, we give a proof Fodors Pressing down lemma, along with an overview of the slightly larger proof of the Nash Williams theorem which states that a graph is decomposable as a disjoint union of cycles if and only if it has no odd cut.

Tuesday, November 24 - Tonicha Crook (Swansea University) from 9:00AM-10:00AM

Title: The Weihrauch Degree of Finding Nash Equilibria in Multiplayer Games

Abstract: Is there an algorithm that takes a game in normal form as input, and outputs a Nash equilibrium? If the payoffs are integers, the answer is yes, and a lot of work has been done in its computational complexity. If the payoffs are permitted to be real numbers, the answer is no, for continuity reasons. It is worthwhile to investigate the precise degree of non-computability (the Weihrauch degree), since knowing the degree entails what other approaches are available (eg, is there a randomized algorithm with positive success change?). The two player case has already been fully classified, but the multiplayer case remains open and is addressed here. As well as some insight into finding the roots of polynomials, which is essential in our research. An in-depth introduction to Weihrauch Reducibility will be included in the presentation, along with a small introduction to Game Theory.

November 30 - Yvette Ren

Title, abstract TBA

Previous Years

The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found here.