NTSGrad Spring 2021/Abstracts

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This page contains the titles and abstracts for talks scheduled in the Spring 2021 semester. To go back to the main GNTS page, click here.


Jan 26

Eiki Norizuki
$p$-adic groups and their representations
This will be a prep talk for Thursday's NTS talk.

We will talk about subgroups and decompositions of $p$-adic groups as well as the Bruhat-Tits tree of $\text{SL}_2$. We try to understand the right class of representations for $p$-adic groups which turn out to be smooth admissible representations.



Feb 2

Qiao He
Supersingular locus of Unitary Shimura variety
I will give a summary of supersingular locus of Unitary Shimura variety. This description is really the first and an important step to understand the structure of Unitary Shimura variety. Turns out that the description of such locus will boil down to certain linear algebra. The final result will be the supersingular locus have a stratification, and the incidence relation will be closely related with the Bruhat-Tits building of unitary group. Also, each strata is closely related with affine Deligne Lustig variety. The Dieudonne module theory will be summarized. Take it for granted, all the remaining material can follow easily!


Feb 9

Ivan Aidun
Simple Sieving
The idea of sieving out primes is among the oldest in mathematics. However, it has proven incredibly fruitful, and now sieve techniques lie behind some of the most striking results in modern number theory, such as the results of Zhang, Maynard, and the Polymath project on bounded gaps between primes. In this talk, I will develop some of the basic sieve constructions, from Eratosthenes and Legendre to Brun, and hint at some of the developments that lie beyond. This talk will be accessible to a general mathematical audience.


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Feb 16

Asvin G
F_un with F_1
You have probably heard of a field with one element in various places and might have been, very understandably, confused. How can there be a field with one element and even if there is, how could it possible be interesting? I will try and explain the philosophy behind why this is a reasonable thing to wish for and various mathematical facts that *should* be interpreted through this lens.

The talk will just be a bunch of examples of the various manifestations of the field with one element throughout mathematics!